We’ve been in quite a few countries these past 2 years. Estonia is my 41st country overall.

Since about 2002, I have wanted to visit Estonia. The idea of traveling around in Northern Europe and coming down through Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania (after visiting Finland) was always part of the idea which also included visiting Denmark, Sweden, and Norway.

It didn’t go quite that way this time.

We’re wanting to get back to the United States to see our families and the new members of our families.

But after just two days in Tallinn, I do believe we will return to Estonia.

We only visited the Tallinn, and we enjoyed ourselves.

There isn’t anything in particular I would recommend you see, but walking around the old town is really nice. The city is really wifi-enabled, and almost everywhere you go, it’s possible to get wireless Internet for free.

There are beautiful churches from the 1300s, old city walls from the same time period, and many nice coffee shops and restaurants. Most of the restaurants you can eat in, in the old town, are in buildings that are at least 300 years old.

That, combined with small houses nestled in to corners, cobblestone streets, friendly people (who all seem to speak amazing English), and “ye olde tyme” style street carts with wooden wheels and old Germanic lettering, give the city a feeling of quaintness.

Up until the beginning of 2011, Estonia maintained it’s own currency. But at the start of 2011, they began using the Euro. This, combined with the upward mobility and growth of Estonians has led to an increase in prices. However, compared with Finland, Tallinn’s prices seem to be about 75% as expensive, so maybe on par with (or slightly more expensive than,) Munich, Germany.

For us, the city gave off a feeling of being home. Perhaps that is because the apartment we stayed in was perfect for us.

It’s definitely possible that you could get bored if you were wanting to explore new things in Tallinn, and thinking you could do that for a month or two, but for us, two days in Tallinn was too few.